Category Archives: Sponsored Post

Getting Political in Plantation

Denise Horland & Pete Tingom

The election was over months ago, but Pete Tingom’s puppeteers must not have let him in on the news … because he’s still out campaigning!

Every month, elected officials, candidates and insiders gather at Hispanic Vote to hear speeches from candidates and network for local elections. Hispanic Vote endorsed Tingom in the 2018 mayoral race. It appears Denise Horland had the bright idea to bring Tingom to network at the notoriously political group on Wednesday March 27 in Davie, and unofficially launch his 2020 campaign.

“Nobody goes to Hispanic Vote unless they’re running for office,” according to one longtime political insider.

Not surprising, since Horland been carrying water of old guard since she was elected. Isit her and her husband’s bright idea is to position themselves at the representative of the small group of residents who support rolling back the clock to the days when our decisions were based on who you know, not good ideas?

Tingom, who looks like he is joining the ranks of Plantations perennial candidates (Looking at you Rico), was former Mayor Dianne Veltri Bendecovic’s handpicked-successor that voters overwhelmingly rejected just a few months ago when Plantation voters elected the highly-qualified Mayor Lynn Stoner.

Stoner is only a few months into her term, but already kept some key promises to voters to end the no-bid taxpayer handouts, have a fair and open bid for city attorney, lower the crime rate, and reverse the decline from years of inaction by the previous administration.

Mayor Stoner’s fattening list of accomplishments is a growing threat to the group of insiders (Tingom, the Horlands and their chamber allies) who want to bring back the days when they could steer millions in tax dollars to favored vendors by overpaying for no-bid contracts that were handed to a small group of insiders.

Two City Hall insiders say Diane still bitter over defeat of her slate. Insiders claim she’s feeding talking points to allies. Is she stirring up angry residents in town to try to disrupt meetings? From sitting in Council meetings, some residents think Councilmember Horland is getting her orders on the dais via text message.

Their plan is simple: 1) cause chaos and disruption in Council to stop the progress we have made since the election and 2) immediately begin the 2020 elections to ramp back up the political division in the Fall 2018.

Never was Horlands’ agenda as obnoxiously evident as it was Wednesday night. Horland was the only NO vote on a hugely supported project needed to revitalize a blighted corner of the city. Instead of voting in the interests of the city, the many residents who testified for the project, and it’s neighbors that elected her, Horland instead chose to attempt to send a message to a developer that refused to support Tingom during the last campaign.

Using your elected office for political gain and to punish campaign opposition is a shameful and unethical practice that should be exposed. Voters rejected Pete and these good ol boy games, but he appears he’s already running again!

The perpetual political campaign with a goal to cause disruption and regain power is bad for our residents and our neighborhoods. Shame on Pete, Dianne, and the Horlands…

Plantation deserves better.
Sponsored post by Plantation resident. REDBROWARD welcomes opposing points of view.

Plantation Moving Forward Under New Management

If you haven’t seen the excellent article about behind-the-scenes Plantation by former Sun-Sentinel political reporter Buddy Nevins, you’re missing out on the inside scoop about the biggest story in town. But there’s more to the story that Buddy only alluded to….

Since the election, our city has made great strides. Yet when the City Attorney was picked from a fair and open bidding process after 40 years of a no-bid contract, one commissioner who wanted to protect their campaign supporters had the nerve to complain about the process. Only one tried to put her thumb on the scale by having the same “gadflies” and “insiders” make noise on Facebook and at meetings.

This commissioner and the old guard insiders” are organizing behind the scenes to thwart the voters and bring us back to the bad ol’ days when the good ol’ boy system of nepotism and cronyism decided the direction of our city, not good ideas. They have decided the way to get there is by creating division and bashing and bullying the mayor via the same obvious proxies and lackies they’ve been using for years.

Plantation residents want what is good for our neighborhoods, not what is good for a small group of individuals to regain power.

They are already seeking out candidates to run in 2020 and think being loud on Facebook and at Council meetings will bring them back to power. They are wrong.

The electorate is more educated then ever and last year, voters set the City of Plantation in a new direction by overwhelmingly rejecting the candidates who wanted a continuation of the same old way of doing things. Instead, our neighbors decided to move our city forward to prevent our city and our neighborhoods from becoming stagnant and blighted.

Residents overwhelmingly rejected the stale policies of Mayor Diane Veltri-Bendekoic and her hand-picked successor Pete Tingom, who ran specifically on a “more of the same” platform. While she and her allies at the Chamber blamed conspiracies and games, Plantation voters simply wanted change. We are ready to move forward.

When this small group of insiders can pick and choose which new businesses can open in the City based on their personal tastes and dislikes, or use their office for electoral revenge, it’s bad for our residents and our neighborhoods.

Plantation residents should be proud of the new direction our city is taking and we must vow to never go back to the old way of doing business.
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Sponsored by a concerned Plantation resident 

Protest Filed In Broward County Deal For New Public Safety Dispatch System

Last month, the Sun-Sentinel reported that a new Broward County 911 dispatch system is planned to launch during 2017. Broward’s radio system is expected to be replaced in 2018. Despite budget pressures, operational issues and important political and public policy questions, Broward County staff hastily recommended the purchase of a more expensive radio system from the incumbent vendor, Motorola. With a history of problems with the current system, provided by Motorola,some believe Broward County and local cities planning to use the new Motorola radio system would be wise to slow down the process in order to ask critical questions about this important decision.

According to sources, Broward County staff rushed through the procurement process with a series of check-box forms that did not probe or assess the claims made by the two bidders on the project. Some of these claims, especially on Motorola’s side, were met with documentation “promising” to perform as required. When the time came to award the bid and the points were tabulated, the incumbent vendor’s proposal squeezed by 2% ahead (609 v. 594 points), even though Harris Corporation, a multi-billion communications vendor from neighboring Brevard County, can provide the required radio system at a 20% cost savings to taxpayers.

According to published reports, the Motorola dispatch system has had numerous, well-documented problems. The Sun-Sentinel reported, “past system complaints have included cell phone callers who were transferred between centers, unanswered calls due to technology issues and first responders sent to incorrect addresses.”

Why is Broward County set to reward a company that has a problematic service history and has significantly scaled back their presence in our community? Is Broward County willing to spend $4 million more for the new radio system when there is a much better offer on the table?

A bid protest filed by Harris with Broward County alleges serious problems with the bidding may offer some clues. The protest claims Motorola failed to provide material information to Broward County staff. Harris claims Motorola was allowed to change its proposal after the submission deadline and waive or negotiate 33 changes they proposed to the Broward County’s required contract form.

Did Motorola do this after seeing Harris proposed no changes to the contract form?

Bottom Line: The County and its municipalities should slow down and discuss this critical public safety issue before rushing into a purchase decision and spending an extra $4 million of the taxpayers’ money.

 

***Editor’s Note—-This Post was sponsored by Chelsey Road Consulting.***