Commissioner Chip LaMarca Co-Hosted Fundraiser With Lawyer Conducting Broward Health Investigation

David DiPietro, left, with Chip LaMarca, attending a Judge Nina Weatherly DiPietro fundraiser at Zimmerman Advertising
David DiPietro, left, with Chip LaMarca attending Judge Nina Weatherly DiPietro fundraiser at Zimmerman Advertising
Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca co-hosted a political fundraiser with the attorney hired to conduct an investigation into misconduct at Broward Health involving LaMarca himself. In June, attorney Mitch Berger hosted a “meet and greet” luncheon at his Berger Singerman firm for Fort Lauderdale Commission candidate Ben Sorenson. Chip LaMarca was the second name listed on the Sorenson invitation. In February, former Broward Health Chairman David Di Pietro, LaMarca’s close adviser and personal attorney, hired Berger Singerman to help State investigators conduct an audit at Broward Health. Following Broward Health CEO Nabil El-Sanadi’s death in January, the State launched an investigation into a $71 million dollar contract involving Broward Health and Zimmerman Advertising. Chip LaMarca was an employee of Zimmerman.

In April, REDBROWARD reported Mitch Berger’s investigation uncovered evidence LaMarca was the driving force behind the huge Zimmerman contract.

Chip LaMarca’s role in the $71 million dollar contract for Zimmerman Advertising dominates the 132 page report from Berger Singerman. LaMarca met the late Dr. Nabil El Sanadi and Doris Peek, a Broward Health senior vice president to discuss the Zimmerman Advertising contract. While LaMarca claims Zimmerman hired him to perform “community relations,” the Berger Singerman report shows he was the main force pushing the contract. According to the report, Peek claims LaMarca threatened El Sanadi. Peek stated the purpose of the meeting “was to discuss Zimmerman’s desire to epand its contract with the District and Mr. LaMarca carried the conversation.” LaMarca told Berger Singerman lawyers that El Sanadi called for the meeting. LaMarca said El Sanadi wanted his advice on “how El Sanadi should approach Mr. Zimmerman about the maketing issue.” Peek claims LaMarca stated at this meeting that his role at Zimmerman was to develop new business for Zimmerman Advertising.

At the same meeting, Peek stated LaMarca asked Broward Health to move its marketing working group meetings to a new night. The group met on Tuesdays, the same day as Broward County Commission meetings. When she asked why he wanted to attend these meetings, Peek claims LaMarca said, “he wished to identify new opportunities which could be mutually beneficial to the District and Zimmerman.”

INTIMIDATION ON THE MENU AT WAFFLE HOUSE

During the Waffle House meeting, Peek claims Chip LaMarca leveled a direct threat at El Sanadi. Peek told investigators that LaMarca said, “I put you here, and I can take you out.” Peek believes LaMarca wanted El Sanadi to support the lucrative contract for Zimmerman Advertising. El Sanadi committed suicide earlier this year.

LaMarca told the Sun-Sentinel he never made the threat. He called Peek’s testimony, a “ridiculous, outlandish statement.” LaMarca told the newspaper he quit his job at Zimmerman so he could, “speak freely to the lawyers writing the report to protect ‘my reputation and my name.'”

In an interview with the Florida Bulldog, LaMarca said, “Having been raised by a good mother, the only way I can describe that woman [Peek] is that she was untruthful.” LaMarca told Bob Norman of WPLG Local 10 News, “This is an unfactual allegation. It’s a lie….I wouldn’t threaten a friend.”

The Berger Singerman reports states LaMarca’s ire may have been directed at Doris Peek as well. Peek was originally scheduled to deliver the Zimmerman proposal to the Broward Health board, but Berger Singerman lawyers learned El Sanadi wanted Peek “removed from the process” because “members of the Zimmerman team were complaining about her ‘interference’ and ‘obstruction.’” Peek believed Jordan Zimmerman and Chip LaMarca tried to get her fired many times between 2015 and El Sanadi’s death in 2016.

LaMarca denied her tried to get Peek fired, “Although he did concede that he believed her to be ‘skeptical’ of Zimmerman’s abilities.”

In March, the Broward Health board fired Berger Singerman. Florida Chief Inspector General Melinda Miguel accused Berger Singerman of interfering with her review and recommended the suspensions of David Di Pietro, the former chairman, and Commissioner Darryl Wright. Gov. Scott suspended both men for “malfeasance” within hours of that recommendation on March 18.

Earlier this month, Broward Health debated whether to pay $200,000 in legal fees to Berger Singerman. According to POLITICO, new chairman Rocky Rodriguez said it wasn’t the “right time” to discuss the bill, and said he needed to get some answers “here and there” regarding the fees.

Several well-place sources claim former Broward Health insiders were applying pressure to board members to pay Berger Singerman. Just as this matter was coming before the board, David Di Pietro’s legal team send a threatening letter to Broward Health Commissioner Sheela Van Hoose. (At one time, Van Hoose owned the REDBROWARD domain name). Attorney Bruce Green, who represented Di Pietro in his lawsuit against Governor Rick Scott, sent a vague letter to Van Hoose ordering her to preserve emails and electronic data regarding REDBROWARD.com. Green never revealed his client and their is no current legal action against Van Hoose or REDBROWARD.com.

State investigators are still trying to gather information related to Zimmerman and LaMarca. Last week, POLITICO reported Broward Health has not turned over documents related to Chip LaMarca. “Melinda Miguel, Scott’s chief inspector general, sent a letter to Broward Health Board of Commissioners Chairman Rocky Rodriguez Monday saying she was ‘deeply troubled by what may be an intentional effort to withhold requested emails from my office’ and told him that Broward Health has until Sept. 23 to provide her office with all the emails she requested from the health care district.” According to POLITICO reporter Christine Sexton, “Miguel’s letter specifically notes that she is looking for emails from Chip LaMarca, Broward County Commissioner and Vice President of Community Relations for the Zimmerman Advertising Agency; former commissioner and board chairman David Di Pietro; and, former Chief Executive Officer Nabil El Sanadi, who commited suicide in January.”

DI PIETRO & LA MARCA AND INSIDERS

In light of the Ben Sorenson fundraiser, questions should be asked about Di Pietro and LaMarca’s relationship with Mitch Berger. Why did Di Pietro, a former operative of the local Mitt Romney and Donald Trump campaigns, hire Democrat power fundraiser Mitch Berger? Are Di Pietro, LaMarca and Berger friends? Does Berger often co-host parties with individuals he has investigated? Was Di Pietro hoping to gain Democrat support for his wife’s political campaign? Judge Nina Weatherly Di Pietro is on the November ballot.

This would not be the first time Di Pietro turned to friends for help in legal matters involving Chip LaMarca.

In 2013, this reporter covered foreclosure proceedings against Chip LaMarca. In May of 2012, Wells Fargo Bank initiated court proceedings in an attempt to collect more than $385,000 from LaMarca and his wife, Eileen LaMarca. A Media Trackers Florida review of court records revealed how lobbyists, professional sports franchises, and the proliferation of campaign cash played a role in the foreclosure case.

Court records showed LaMarca failed to make payments on a line of credit issued by Wells Fargo bank in June of 2006. Bank statements showed he stopped making payments in August of 2010, just before winning the 2010 county commissioner election.

David DiPietro represented LaMarca in the foreclosure case.

On October 2, 2013 a court order granted mediation between Wells Fargo and LaMarca, appointing a “Joy Speechler” as mediator. Local lawyers believe the court website misspelled mediator Jay Spechler’s name as “Joy Speechler.” Spechler, a former Broward County judge, is a prominent mediator who frequently works with DiPietro.

Just days later at Broward County Commission meeting, LaMarca and seven other Broward County Commissioners voted to approve a new financial arrangement with a local children’s art museum. Several years ago, the Commission gave $3 million to help build a new facility for the Young At Art Museum.  In exchange for a 40-year lease, the museum promised to repay the money over 11 years.

With nearly $2 million in past due payments, Young At Art announced it would miss another payment deadline. The County Commission voted to allow Young At Art to refinance the deal and make its payments over 40 years rather than 11. In the days before the vote, Mindy Shrago, Executive Director/CEO of Young At Art, visited commissioners. The Commission visitors log shows Shrago met with LaMarca on October 21, 2013 at 4:00pm.

Mindy Shrago is the wife of former Judge Jay Spechler. LaMarca never mentioned a potential conflict of interest before casting his vote on the refinancing measure.

INTIMIDATION GAME PART DEUX

This week, REDBROWARD exposed an apparent attempt to prevent a story regarding Young At Art.

As the new chairman of the Young At Art board, David Di Pietro is trying to work out another new deal between the faltering children’s museum and the County. According to the Sun-Sentinel, Broward County invested $20.6 million into YAA, expecting $11.2 million back in 11 years. But the museum defaulted almost immediately after the museum opened in 2012. The deal was changed to allow YAA to repay the money over 37 years. Sun-Sentinel reporter Brittany Wallman wrote, “County Auditor Evan Lukic said in a recent memo the museum isn’t honoring that agreement, either. The museum was to give the county half of any pledge payments, a tab Lukic says was underpaid by $240,888. Lukic also doubted the museum’s ability to pay what it owes in the future.”

During early voting in August at the Coral Ridge Mall,  Jay Spechler and Mindy Shrago were spotted campaigning for Judge Nina Weatherly Di Pietro. In a conversation with Spechler and Shrago, this reporter asked Spechler about an issue concerning Young At Art Museum. A visibly angry Spechler asked this reporter how he would “feel if somebody came after your kids.” When this reporter asked if Spechler was issuing a threat, Shrago implored her husband to calm down because, “we’re so close to a new deal” with Broward County.

Less than a month later, one of Di Pietro’s lawyers sent the legal letter to Broward Health Commissioner Sheela Van Hoose. Shortly after the letter was sent, Spechler sent an emissary to broker a “truce.” They were told to contract REDBROWARD directly. The next day, someone posted a picture of this reporter and his family on the JAABLaw website. The minor children of this reporter were clearly visible in the photograph, which included a link to a gay slur and a heavy dose of body shaming. Thankfully, the operator of JAABLaw pulled the post.


 

SOON: THE VIDEOS YOUNG AT ART DOES NOT WANT YOU TO SEE

Dale Holness Endorsement, Hallandale Beach Censorship Signal End Of Sun-Sentinel?

Bill Julian, left. Rosemary O’Hara & Dale Holness

To borrow a line from the Bard of Avon, “I come to bury the Sun-Sentinel, not to praise it.” Over the last week, the paper of record for Broward county has abandoned its duty, to its readers and its reporters, to stand up to politicians and their cronies. Last Saturday, the Sun-Sentinel endorsed the re-election of highly controversial Broward County Commissioner Dale V.C. Holness. A few days later, the newspaper made national headlines when POLITICO revealed the Sun-Sentinel pulled a story regarding alleged corruption in Hallandale Beach.

On Wednesday, WPLG investigative reporter Bob Norman exposed a recording of Hallandale Beach vice mayor Bill Julian admitting his vote for a condo development in exchange for a favor. “What they don’t know is they’re buying the food bank a frigging van that I couldn’t tell anybody,” Julian said. Norman said an attorney for the developer “secretly promised him that they would buy the Hallandale Food Pantry, Julian’s pet project in the city, a new van.”

According to Julian, the attorney, Debbie Orshefsky promised to back his re-election campaign. “Orshefsky tells me, before this, ‘Don’t worry, we’ll have 300 people out in the street for you when you run for office,'” the vice mayor said on the phone.

After listening to recording, Julian admitted to accepting favors in return for his vote. Norman reported, “Julian immediately admitted that he had agreed to accept those gifts during negotiations in a meeting with one of the project developers, Michael Meyers, and Orshefsky, a partner in the Holland & Knight law firm and one of the most prolific development attorneys in South Florida.” Julian admitted he asked for the van to be given to the food pantry.

“People are going to think that I’m taking bribes,” Julian said. “They are going to say, ‘Wow, Bill, after all these years, he turned out to be another criminal.'”

One would assume the South Florida Sun-Sentinel would be all over this story. Normally, local television reporters don’t cover the Hallandale Beach beat. These local government stories are covered by Sun-Sentinel reporters and Hallandale Beach bloggers like David Smith.

SUN-SENTINEL KEEPS REPORTERS AWAY FROM HALLANDALE BEACH MEETING

As it turned out, the Sun-Sentinel did not want to cover the Hallandale Beach scandal. First, Buddy Nevins of Broward Beat reported the paper pulled a Hallandale Beach story from its website. Then, the story made national headlines. POLITICO reported the paper “killed” the story. Marc Caputo said killing the story was “A move by the newspaper’s leadership that appears to be part of a pattern of censoring controversial stories, according to multiple sources inside and outside the Fort Lauderdale newsroom.”

Sources told Caputo that reporters were forbidden to attend Thursday’s Hallandale Beach Commission meeting by publisher Howard Saltz. At this meeting, two commissioners were threatened with arrest for speaking about the Julian scandal. Mayor Joy Cooper ended up cutting the meeting short. Bob Norman and Channel 10 got the whole mess on video.

“Saltz kills stories in the classic way: He nitpicks them to death,” said one source familiar with the newsroom discussions of the story. “So here he was saying, ‘oh, this is just an allegation. We don’t have all the facts. It’s not responsible to put this out there. We don’t have comment from Julian.’ And then what happens? They stop [reporter] Susannah [Bryan] from covering the meeting the next day and getting comment from Julian.”

Buddy Nevins told Caputo, “I keep hearing that stories are being killed from time to time and no one knows why….The reporters feel they shouldn’t rock the boat.”

Shouldn’t the Sun-Sentinel reporters “rock the boat” when an elected politician admits on audio and video to accepting gifts in exchange for his vote? Isn’t this the duty of a public watchdog? Why didn’t Saltz send every single reporter to Hallandale Beach to cover this story?

“AND ABSENT A BETTER CASE TO FIRE THE INCUMBENT–WE ENDORSE HOLNESS”

In its surprising endorsement in the Broward County Commission, District 9 race, the Sun-Sentinel editorial board actually wrote the following: “and absent a better case to fire the incumbent — we endorse [Dale] Holness. What? Is this a joke?

We know times are tough at TRONC and the Sun-Sentinel, but we’re pretty sure they have access to the internet. Plus, they should have access to old copies of their own newspaper. Hell, the editorial board could just call up their own reporters.

They needed a “better case” to fire Dale Holness?!?

The editorial board wrote, “But Holness, a real estate broker, is not without controversy. In recent years, he has faced foreclosures, delinquent taxes and code violations on properties he owns. He largely blames the recession.” They said he made the “mistake” of meddling in other Broward county races. A mistake?!? As in, oops I didn’t mean to do that?

Come on Rosemary O’Hara, that’s it? That’s your due diligence? You could make a better case to give Holness the boot?

What about the Sun-Sentinel story two weeks ago showing Dale Holness used taxpayer money to send campaign newsletters? Brittany Wallman wrote, “Holness read from the piece at the Sun Sentinel Editorial Board candidate interviews. At the interview, Smith referred to the newsletter as ‘that sheet that he uses at every campaign rally … paid for by the county.”’ Wallman reported Broward taxapyers spent more than $5,000 on the newsletter.

Let’s get this straight, Holness admits to using public funds to bolster his campaign AT HIS MEETING WITH THE SUN-SENTINEL EDITORIAL BOARD and you still endorse him? In the endorsement you said, “In the end, we decided to endorse the incumbent because he’s been in the trenches fighting, with some success.” Yeah, he’s been fighting with the public money.

Did you talk to Sun-Sentinel reporter Lisa Huriash? In 2013, she reported Dale Holness was not paying his property taxes. Huriash reported, “Broward Commissioner Dale V.C. Holness owes almost $13,000 in unpaid property taxes on five apartments he owns in Lauderhill, records show.” Holness blamed the economy and this reporter for breaking the story.

“I believe we ought to be good stewards,” he said. “And I’m very conservative in my expenditures. In my personal life I don’t spend unless it’s important for my children.” Yeah, but he’s not a great steward of neighborhoods in District 9.

For that story you should have called up Sun-Sentinel reporter Megan O’Matz. In 2012, she reported how Holness treated his tenants. She wrote, “But for years Holness held title to a Fort Lauderdale rental property that became an unattractive wreck. He did not repair it. The house fell into foreclosure and city code violation fines began mounting — totaling $6,425 currently and still growing.”

“At the Fort Lauderdale house, it was Holness, one of the county’s top elected officials, who was owner for eight years. White boards now cover the windows. Bottles and other trash are scattered around the lawn. A screen enclosure over the backyard patio is shredded. Public notices from the city and bank representatives are taped to the front door and garage.”

This is the guy you said was in the trenches fighting for his district?

What about the questions surrounding whether Holness even lived in the district? This reporter found ample evidence Holness was lying about his residency.

In 2013 we reported Holness appeared to be thumbing his nose at residency laws regarding Broward County Commissioners. Very strong evidence indicated Holness lived outside the district he represents, though Article II, Section 2.01 A(3) of the Broward County Charter clearly states each commissioner “must be a resident of the particular district upon election.”

According to records from the Broward County Supervisor of Elections (SOE), Holness registered to vote within District 9 by claiming to live in a small, older 940-square foot townhome in the Royal Oaks townhome development at 2630 N.W. 52nd Avenue in Lauderhill. Property records from the Broward County Property Appraiser (BCPA) show Holmes owns the small home but does not list it as his primary residence for his homestead tax exemption. Broward tax collector records show Holness owes $2,586.86 in delinquent taxes.

A visit to the townhome showed it was being used as storage facility. When confronted by Bob Norman, Holness continued the charade. “My home … is at 2630,” said Holness, referring to the unit 2630 NW 52nd Avenue, one of several homes Holness, a landlord, owns in the neighborhood.” The property handyman told Norman that nobody lived in the unit. Norman described Holness’ home as “a small run-down housing unit in Lauderhill stacked to the ceiling with furniture and boxes. A realtor’s locked box hangs from the door knob. The refrigerator isn’t plugged in and its door is wide open.”

Don’t these stories make a compelling case NOT to endorse Dale Holness? Shouldn’t the residents of District 9 expect better from their public servants? Don’t they deserve better from their politicians and their newspaper?

2014 ENDORSEMENTS JUST AS BAD

Sadly, Rosemary O’Hara and the Sun-Sentinel editorial board have a poor track record when it comes to endorsements. Instead of acting as public watchdogs, they have tended to protect insiders and the status quo. In 2014, we exposed their shameful endorsement of then Judge Steven Feren.

We wrote, “As evidenced by their endorsements this week, the Sun-Sentinel editorial board has given up. And they want you to wave the white flag of surrender too. Instead of fighting the corruption, the lazy politicians and slimy consultants, the Sun-Sentinel editorial board wants you to ‘hold your nose’ and vote to keep things the same.”

In their endorsement of Feren, they called Feren the “underwhelming favorite.” They spoke about his reputation of being lazy and leaving working early. When asked if he takes Fridays off, Feren told them he’s just as likely to leave early on a Monday. “I’m just as likely to leave at 4 o’clock on a Monday or Tuesday as I am on a Friday,” Feren said. “Judges aren’t elected to punch the clock.”

Once again, the editorial board ignored the evidence showing Feren was not fit to remain on the bench.

RED BROWARD reported on Feren’s removal from juvenile court after the Fourth District Court Of Appeals ruled he was being unfair to juvenile defendants. The appellate judges feared Feren was pushing Broward’s youth, assuming the charges against them proved their guilt. Feren was punishing minors for proclaiming their innocence.

Then, there was the case of little Lilly Baumann. Two-year old Lilly went missing in May 2014 when she disappeared with her racist, conspiracy theory-loving, gun-toting mother. Lilly’s dad, Robert Baumann, begged for full custody of Lilly. He brought pictures of Lilly playing with boxes of bullets to Feren, hoping he would protect Lilly from her mother and her boyfriend. He showed racist YouTube videos posted by the boyfriend. Baumann gave Feren pictures of Lilly clad in Confederate gear among strangers.

Feren ignored Baumann’s plea. He told Lilly’s mom to buy gun locks. Two months after awarding joint custody to Megan Everett, she vanished with Lilly. She left a rambling letter discussing the evils of vaccinations, black history and Abraham Lincoln.

When Robert Baumann was at his most vulnerable, when he feared for the safety of his little girl, he believed Judge Steven B. Feren would protect him.

Broward voters ingored the Sun-Sentinel and Feren was defeated. Luckily, one year later,  the FBI found Lilly Baumann.

WHO IS MAKING THE DECISION?

During this year’s Sun-Sentinel editorial board interviews, REDBROWARD received troubling phone calls about the process. Candidates complained that non-employees were attending the interviews. Others were told reporters sitting in on the interviews were not allowed to ask questions.

On August 16, editor Rosemary O’Hara responded to our questions about the interview process. She wrote, “I’m not sure I understand your question about who attended interviews? But the answer is depending on the race, it was myself, Gary Stein, Andrew Abramson, my husband Tom O’Hara (an FAU visiting professor, former newspaper editor and freelance journalist), and/or Randy Schultz, a former newspaper editor and freelance journalist. We also had reporters and editors attend some meetings, although they are not involved in deciding our endorsements.”

Did we miss “Bring Your Spouse To Work” day? Why are former editors sitting in on meetings? Do they have any frame of reference when it comes to Broward politics? Why are you ignoring the wisdom and first hand knowledge of your reporters? And what’s up with Randy Schultz?

Last we heard, he was wrapped up in political scandal in Palm Beach. Ace investigative reporter Jose Lambiet reported Schultz and one of his top lieutenants had a cozy relationship with the Palm Beach State Attorney. In 2011, emails obtained by Lambiet revealed an ultra-cozy relationship between State Attorney Michael McAuliffe and at least two of the newspaper’s figureheads.

“In one email dated Nov. 2, 2011, Rhonda Swan, one of the newspapers’ editorial writers, bypassed the proper channels and asked McAuliffe to get involved in a criminal investigation where she was named,” Lambiet reported.

In other emails, Randy Schultz, the newspaper’s Editorial Page Editor, “appeared to coach McAuliffe on how to write op-ed pieces published in the Post,editorials where McAuliffe refuted criticisms of his administration or advanced his political agenda.” Two years later, Schultz opted for a buyout from the paper.

So why is this guy involved in Broward politics?

Does anyone at the Sun-Sentinel have a cozy relationship with Dale Holness or Bill Julian?

Broward voters deserve editors that will empower reporters to ask tough questions. Reporters deserve editors that will back them up when they “speak truth to power.”

We deserve answers. We deserve better.

Another Broward Democrat Wants To Represent District She Doesn’t Live In

Roxanne Y. Valies (via Twitter)
Roxanne Y. Valies (via Twitter)

Democrat Roxanne Y. Valies wants Broward voters to send her to Tallahassee to represent District 95 in the Florida House of Representatives. This largely minority district includes Lauderdale Lakes, Lauderhill and North Lauderdale. Just one small problem: according to numerous Federal, State and local records, Roxanne Y. Valies does not live in District 95.

The Florida Constitution requires all state legislators to live in the House or Senate district they represent. Since 2013, this reporter has exposed numerous politicians violating the residency requirement. These politicians included State Sen. Maria Sachs, Rep. Lori Berman, Rep. Perry Thurston, Rep. Jared Moskowitz, Rep. Alan Williams, and Hazelle Rogers, the current representative of District 95.

As first reported in April 2013, Rogers owns a large home with her husband outside the District she represents, but claims she is living  in a small, older condominium within her district.

In 2008, Rogers listed a Lauderdale Lakes house in District 94 as her official mailing address. The 2,184-square foot home is owned by Rogers and her husband, Clifton. Records from the Florida Division of Elections show the Rogers home is the current official address for Premier Group Enterprises, Inc. Documents filed on April 17, 2012 show Rogers and her husband are officers of the corporation.

In campaign documents filed with the State Division of Elections, Rogers now lists a small Lauderdale Lakes condominium in District 95 as her address. Broward Property Appraiser records confirm Rogers owns a 944-square foot condominium built around 1970. Although Rogers and her husband still own a house that is much nicer and more than twice the size of the 944-square-foot condominium, Rogers claims she meets the Florida Constitution’s residency requirements, insisting she uses the small condominium as her primary residence.

In March 2014, the Florida Legislature and Governor Rick Scott took steps to end this residency game. Joint Rule 7 of the Joint Rules of the Florida Legislature Resolution states,” A member shall be a legal resident and elector of his or her district at the time of election and shall maintain his or her legal residence within that district for the duration of his or her term of office. While a member may have multiple residences, he or she shall have only one legal residence. The legal residence of a member at a designated location is demonstrated by a totality of the circumstances.”

The Joint Resolution lists several factors to determine legal residence. These include the “abandonment of a prior legal residence” by selling that residence or giving up “rights and privileges” regarding the other residence. Other factors include voter registration records, bank records, homestead tax exemptions, and receipt of mail. The location of a legislator’s spouse and minor children can also be a factor.

Each lawmaker will be required to affirm, in writing, that he or she resides within the district. If evidence shows a lawmaker does not reside within the district, the legislature, acting as the sole judge in residency matters, will determine a vacancy has occurred.

Valies currently resides in House District 97, represented by Democrat Jared Moskowitz. According to the Broward County Property Appraiser (BCPA), Valies has owned a spacious Sunrise townhome since 1998. Valies receives the full Homestead tax exemption at this address.

BCPA records show Valies has owned a much smaller Lauderhill condominium since 2003.

While her official campaign documents filed with the State of Florida show a Tamarac address, voter registration websites show Valies is still registered to vote at her Sunrise home.

Corporate documents Valies filed with the State also use her Sunrise address.

Federal campaign records from 2012 and 2014 show Valies made contributions to the Obama Victory Fund and the Democrat Executive Committee of Florida. These contributions list Valies address in Sunrise.

Of course, Valies simply needs to reside in District 95 on the day of her election. Will she actually move into her small condo?

Or will she play the residency games perfected by Hazelle Rogers?

After all, Valies was recently an official with the Lauderhill Regional Chamber Of Commerce. Even though she lives in Sunrise.